Advice: So You Want to Write?

I have some exciting news! Casey Dawes, Clare Woods, and I have started a company to help all authors through every step of publishing. This includes writing coaching, editing, cover design, marketing support, and everything in between. We created Self-Publishing Services with a simple goal in mind: to give writers all the tools they needed to succeed in creating their best book. Whether this means we are working on their first book or their twentieth, a children’s book or an epic novel, the goal is always the same, we’re there to help authors navigate the world of self-publishing and come through with an amazing book.

Self-Publishing Services LLC will be officially launching in September, but I’m pleased to say that we are already busy with clients (if you are interested in our services, please let me know).

This week, I have spent a great deal of time working with folks who want to start writing professionally. Over and over I have been asked for advice. While there is much I can say about writing, I think the most important thing to remember is to remember why you want to become an author. What about you drives you to want to follow this dream? Is it a dream of fame and fortune? A desire to contribute? You want to see your name in print?eye on the ball

All of these things are important and are legitimate reasons to want to write, but the sad truth is that these may not be strong enough reasons to continue the journey when the going gets tough. Writing isn’t an easy business. Almost anyone can put enough words together to make a book, but few can make a good book and even fewer have what it takes to get a book (regardless of how well it is written) into the hands of millions.

Writing is a multifaceted world of business, creative gumption, and the ability to be mutually extroverted and introverted. Long gone are the days where a writer could simply sit behind a computer and write. The new world of publishing requires travel, public speaking, time, patience, and a incredible determination. So before a new author starts down this path, I always ask them: Why? What drives you to follow this dream? Do you want it to be a career or a hobby?

If this is a career option for you, I strongly recommend that you write down the reason you want to follow this path. Hide the note. Put it somewhere that only you can find it. And then, years later, after you’ve finished that first or second book and your find yourself road-worn by rejection letters, reviews, sales, or whatever else is getting you down, you can come back and be revitalized by the former you.

At this point, I’m seventeen books into writing. I plan on writing many, many more. Does that mean I’m immune to low days? Hardly. Yet, I have learned to move past these points and keep my chin up. The trick is the same for both writing and life: keep Moving Forward, learn from the past but don’t stop, don’t become stagnant or complacent, keep learning, and as I tell my little league softball players–keep your eye on the ball/the reason you started your journey as an author.

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